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Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccine

STUDY REVEALS IMPORTANT SIDE EFFECT OF MASS VARICELLA VACCINATION OF HEALTHY CHILDREN: Reduction in chickenpox may increase incidence of shingles - Gary S. Goldman., PhD.

DATA REVEALS THREAT OF SHINGLES EPIDEMIC FROM VACCINE USE - Health Officials Threaten Legal Action Against Researcher Three different analyses of reported cases of shingles and chickenpox were published today in the October 2003 issue of Vaccine and suggest the threat of a shingles epidemic in the US due to mass vaccination with varicella (chickenpox) vaccine - Gary S. Goldman., PhD..

The Case against Universal Varicella Vaccination By Gary S. Goldman

Trading Chicken Pox for Shingles? Vax Induced Disease Creates Demand for New Vax?

Review of the United States universal varicella vaccination program: Herpes zoster incidence rates, cost-effectiveness, and vaccine efficacy based primarily on the Antelope Valley Varicella Active Surveillance Project data

Appendix X. Brief Summary of Chickenpox: A New Epidemic of Disease and Corruption

Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccine: This Is Why a Shingles Epidemic Is Bolting Straight at the U.S.

Herpes Zoster (Shingles) & Shingles Vaccine

Chicken Pox (Varicella) Vaccine Information

Does this make sense to you???? Chicken Pox vaccine effectiveness decreases after first year
But still yields excellent protection from the virus..

NO URL.

M2 Presswire; 2/18/2004 .

M2 PRESSWIRE-18 February 2004-YALE: Chicken Pox vaccine effectiveness decreases after first year, But still yields excellent protection from the virus(C)1994-2004 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD .

RDATE:02172004

"The effectiveness of the varicella vaccine does drop substantially from 99 percent the first year after vaccination to 84 percent two to eight years after vaccination," said first author Marietta Vazquez, M.D., associate research scientist in the Department of Pediatrics at Yale School of Medicine. "But eight years after vaccination, the overall effectiveness is 87 percent, which is still excellent.".

The study, published in the February 18 issue of Journal of the American Medical Association, also suggests that the vaccine might be less effective in the first year after vaccination if it is administered to children less than 15 months of age. Vazquez said this difference in effectiveness disappears after the first year and overall is not significant..

The ongoing study conducted over the past seven years addresses concerns about varicella outbreaks in highly immunized groups that have raised controversy about the effectiveness of the varicella vaccine. The authors assessed whether the effectiveness of varicella vaccine is affected either by time since vaccination or age at the time of vaccination. They studied 339 children ages 13 months or older who were clinically diagnosed with chicken pox after they had been vaccinated with varicella. Two controls were selected for each study participant, matched by age and pediatric practice..

The researchers found the significant decrease in effectiveness one year after vaccination, but most cases of breakthrough disease are mild. .

"The vaccine's effectiveness against moderate or severe disease is excellent throughout the period of the study," said Vazquez. .

Vazquez and her team stress that it will be important to continue monitoring effectiveness of the vaccine since boosts to immunity from exposure to varicella will become increasingly rare as the incidence of varicella diminishes. .

Other authors on the study included senior investigator Eugene D. Shapiro, M.D., Linda M. Niccolai and Catherine E. .

Muchlenbein of Yale; and Philip S. LaRussa, M.D., Anne A. .

Gershon, M.D. and Sharon P. Steinberg of Columbia University. .

Citation: Journal of the American Medical Association, February 18, 2004-Vol. 291, No. 7 .

CONTACT: Karen N. PeartTel: +1 203 432 1326e-mail: karen.peart@yale.edu .

((M2 Communications Ltd disclaims all liability for information provided. within M2 PressWIRE. Data prepared by named party/parties. Further information on M2 PressWIRE can be obtained at http://www.presswire.net on the world wide web. Inquiries to info@m2.com)). .


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